Melaniq – supplement for hair pigmentation.

Buy Now ,Melaniq is a food supplement.

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Melaniq® is a food supplement for hair pigmentation, specifically designed to support your body’s ability to produce melanin, the natural pigment that gives your hair its colour. It contains copper, the mineral that is essential for the synthesis of melanin. Melanin is produced in specialised cells, called melanocytes. The initial step of melanin biosynthesis is catalysed by the enzyme tyrosinase, which contains copper at its active site. It utilises L-tyrosine, which is also an activator of the whole process, as well as the initial substrate. When your hair follicles are not getting enough nutrients and minerals or, for example, when the melanocytes can’t cope with the oxidative stress anymore, the ability to produce melanin may gradually terminate. As a result, your hair turns grey. By combining copper with L-tyrosine, essential vitamins, a strong antioxidant and a seaweed of high nutritional value, scientists at Oxford Biolabs have recently improved Melaniq®, making it the first choice when it comes to supporting your natural hair colour with a food supplement.

  • Contains copper, which contributes to normal hair pigmentation.
  • Specifically formulated to support the body’s ability to produce melanin.
  • Suitable for vegetarians.
  • Manufactured in Germany.

TAKE CONTROL OF GREYING HAIR WITH MELANIQ®

Melaniq® has been created for those experiencing premature greying and greying in general, as well as for those who would like to tackle greying hair.

MELANIQ® FOOD SUPPLEMENT FOR HAIR PIGMENTATION

As people age, their chances of going grey increase because hair follicles start losing the ability to produce pigmented hair. For many, the process of greying begins in their thirties, with 74% of men and women going significantly grey between the ages of 45 and 65. Having recognised that the premature ageing of hair is an issue of both physical and emotional concern, the team of Oxford Biolabs scientists has come up with an innovative approach.

By combining copper with L-tyrosine, essential vitamins, a strong antioxidant and a seaweed of high nutritional value, they developed a unique formula to support natural hair colour. Melaniq®, a food supplement for hair pigmentation, is the result of world-leading research and a combination of high quality, naturally-based ingredients. Three capsules of Melaniq® taken per day can contribute to normal hair pigmentation and the maintenance of natural hair colour.

WHAT CAN I EXPECT?

  • Support of normal hair pigmentation.
  • The supply of important nutrients necessary for melanin biosynthesis that can help to slow down the process of greying.
  • No major side effects.
  • No hormone interference.

WHAT SHOULD I NOT EXPECT?

  • Reversal of grey hair. Melaniq® is developed for men and women who are experiencing greying in the early stages, or those wishing to delay the onset of grey hair. The effect in more advanced stages of greying will be less pronounced.
  • An immediate effect. Taking Melaniq® regularly and over a prolonged period of time is critical to success.

HOW IT WORKS

The enzyme at the heart of hair pigment production is tyrosinase. The activity of this important enzyme is dependent on the availability of copper, which is built into the active centre of tyrosinase. It has been shown that people suffering from premature greying have a reduced level of copper in their blood serum. An insufficient supply of copper results in the reduced activity of tyrosinase and hence reduced pigment production, ultimately causing the onset of grey hair. Therefore, Melaniq® contains copper and L-tyrosine, the starting molecule as well as activator of melanin biosynthesis. Biotin, which is also part of the Melaniq® formula, contributes to the maintenance of normal hair. These core ingredients are found within a blend of complementary compounds: key vitamins (D, B12, folic acid), natural plant extracts (green tea (contains epigallocatechin-3-gallate), Japanese pagoda tree bark (contains quercetin), tomato (contains lycopene)), as well as the brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum. During the process of greying, melanocytes may also slowly lose their ability to cope with oxidative damage. For this purpose the formula is completed with vitamin C, which contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress. This unique formulation of Melaniq® can supply the nutrients your body needs for the maintenance of natural hair colour.

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Definition of Hair at Dictionary.com

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Noun

Any of the numerous fine, usually cylindrical, keratinous filaments growing from the skin of humans and animals; a pilus.

an aggregate of such filaments, as that covering the human head or forming the coat of most mammals.

a similar fine, filamentous outgrowth from the body of insects, spiders, etc.

Botany. a filamentous outgrowth of the epidermis.

cloth made of hair from animals, as camel and alpaca.

a very small amount, degree, measure, magnitude, etc.; a fraction, as of time or space: He lost the race by a hair.

Omega your hair nice

Increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids may stimulate your hair follicles and sebaceous glands. While this won’t cause your hair to grow, it may improve scalp health.

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in cold-water fish, such as salmon, sardines, and herring. Other good sources include:

  • flax seed
  • yogurt
  • cottage cheese
  • salad
  • cereal

Words nearby hair

hainan

,

hainan strait

,

hainaut

,

haines city

,

haiphong

,

hair

,

hair bulb

,

hair cast

,

hair cell

,

hair disk

,

hair follicle

Origin of hair

before 900; Middle English heer, Old English hǣr (cognate with Dutch, German haar, Old Norse hār), with vowel perhaps from Middle English haire hair shirt Old French Old High German hāria (cognate with Middle English here, Old English hǣre, Old Norse hǣra)

Choose the right shampoo

Using the wrong shampoo and styling agent can cause significant hair damage. Look for products that are right for your hair type — oily, normal, or dry — and target any problems you have, such as dandruff.

Try to avoid shampoos with harsh ingredients, such as ammonium lauryl sulfate or sodium lauryl sulfate. And remember, cost doesn’t necessarily indicate the quality of a product.

OTHER WORDS FROM hair

hair·like, adjectivede·hair, verb (used with object)

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH hair

hair hare

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hair

  • But his fingers moved through her silky strands of hair, and then down her neck.

  • They dye their hair and alter their clothes, but not enough to attract attention from authorities.

  • While the look worked for some, the combination of heat and chemicals took a toll on the hair of others.

  • The idea to invest in their own hair company came from Miko after seeing how clients at their salon responded to her natural hair.

  • “You can cut my hair, you can bald me, you can strip me naked and take away my dignity,” she said.

  • A large proportion of mammals have the surface fairly uniformly covered with hair of one kind only.

  • I pinned a clean towel round my neck, barber fashion, and pulling the pins out of my hair, shook it down over my shoulders.

  • Lady Cecilia rose from the bed, advanced towards the mirror, and smoothed her hair.

  • Between that and the wildcats it made our hair stand on end and the chills go up and down our spines.

  • He could scent the flower-like odour of her body and wrapping, even her hair.

British Dictionary definitions for hair

hair

noun

any of the threadlike pigmented structures that grow from follicles beneath the skin of mammals and consist of layers of dead keratinized cells

a growth of such structures, as on the human head or animal body, which helps prevent heat loss from the body

botany any threadlike outgrowth from the epidermis, such as a root hair

  1. a fabric or material made from the hair of some animals
  2. (as modifier)a hair carpet; a hair shirt

get in someone’s hair informal to annoy someone persistently

hair of the dog or hair of the dog that bit one an alcoholic drink taken as an antidote to a hangover

keep your hair on! British informal keep calm

let one’s hair down to behave without reserve

not turn a hair to show no surprise, anger, fear, etc

split hairs to make petty and unnecessary distinctions

Hair maintenance tips

Keep these tips in mind for healthy locks:

  • Start off on the lowest heat setting while blow drying and gradually increase heat as needed.
  • Allow your hair to air dry whenever possible.
  • Change up where you place pins and clips so that breakage isn’t localized.
  • If you dye your hair, choose a shade that’s within three shades of your natural color.
  • Massage your scalp often to promote hair growth and increase blood circulation.
  • Get your hair cut regularly — every 10 to 12 weeks — to keep hair healthy and prevent split ends.

Word Origin for hair

Old English hær; related to Old Norse hār, Old High German hār hair, Norwegian herren stiff, hard, Lettish sari bristles, Latin crescere to grow

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for hair

hair

Any of the cylindrical, keratinized, often pigmented filaments characteristically growing from the epidermis of a mammal.

A growth of such filaments, as that forming the coat of an animal or covering the scalp of a human.

One of the fine hairlike processes of a sensory cell.

The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for hair

hair

One of the fine strands that grow from the skin of mammals, usually providing insulation against the cold. Modified hairs sometimes serve as protective defenses, as in the quills of a porcupine or hedgehog, or as tactile organs, as in the whiskers (called vibrissae) of many nocturnal mammals. Hair filaments are a modification of the epidermis of the skin and are composed primarily of keratin. Hair also contains melanin, which determines hair color.

A slender growth resembling a mammalian hair, found on insects and other animals.

A fine, threadlike growth from the epidermis of plants. See more at trichome.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with hair

hair

In addition to the idioms beginning with hair

  • hair of the dog that bit you
  • hair shirt

also see:

  • bad hair day
  • by a hair
  • by the short hairs
  • fair-haired boy
  • get gray hair from
  • hang by a thread (hair)
  • hide or hair
  • in someone’s hair
  • let one’s hair down
  • make one’s hair stand on end
  • put lead in one’s pencil (hair on one’s chest)
  • split hairs
  • tear one’s hair
  • turn a hair

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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What really works for women’s hair loss?

Is your part widening?

Have you noticed that your ponytail is thinner these days? You may have female pattern hair loss (FPHL), a condition that affects millions of women. FPHL is actually the most-common cause of hair loss in women. 

For most women, FPHL begins in midlife, when a woman is in her 40s, 50s, or 60s. It can begin earlier for some women. 

FPHL is a progressive condition. This means women tend to continue losing hair. But women do not lose all of their hair, as do some men. Instead, your part often gets wider. Hair near your temples may recede. Without treatment, some women eventually develop widespread thinning.

Treatment can prevent hair loss from worsening and help women regrow their hair. Treatment delivers the best results when started at the first sign of hair loss.

How can I tell if I have female pattern hair loss?

It’s best to make an appointment to see a dermatologist. Dermatologists are the experts in diagnosing and treating hair loss. A dermatologist can tell you whether it’s FPHR or something else that is causing your hair loss. Other causes of hair loss can look like FPHL, so it’s important to rule out these causes.

What causes female pattern hair loss?

It’s hereditary. You inherit the genes from your mother, father, or both. Because FPHL is more common after menopause, hormones may also play a role.

How do dermatologists treat female pattern hair loss?

To give women optimal results, dermatologists may use more than one hair-loss treatment. For FPHL, treatment options include the following.

Minoxidil (meh-nox-eh-dil): Long used to treat male pattern hair loss, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved this non-prescription treatment for women. Today, it is the most-recommended treatment for FPHL. Products containing either 2% or 5% minoxidil have been approved to treat FPHL. 

What should I know about using minoxidil? For the first two to eight weeks, you may notice a temporary increase in hair loss. This stops when your hair begins to regrow. 

A common side effect of minoxidil is an irritated scalp, which may cause dryness, scaling, itching, and/or redness on your scalp. If this happens, it’s best to stop using minoxidil and see your dermatologist.

Another possible side effect is to see hair growing in places other than your scalp, such as on your cheeks and forehead. If this happens, you can limit it by:

  1. Trying to apply minoxidil only to your scalp and avoiding other areas
  2. Washing your face after you apply minoxidil to your scalp

When will I see results? Hair grows slowly, so it takes time to see results. You’ll need to use minoxidil continuously for about one year before you know how well it will work for you. If this medication works for you, you’ll need to use it every day to continue getting results.  When you stop, the hairs that grew because of minoxidil will fall out within three to four months, and your hair loss can continue.

Minoxidil, pregnancy, and breastfeeding: Women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant should avoid minoxidil. Studies of pregnant animals have shown minoxidil can be harmful to a developing fetus. 

Women who are breastfeeding should also avoid minoxidil. Traces of minoxidil may pass into breast milk, which can be harmful to a nursing infant. 

How is minoxidil used? You apply it to your dry scalp. Some products you should apply once a day. Others you apply twice a day. 

Minoxidil, pregnancy, and breastfeeding

Women who are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or who are breastfeeding should avoid minoxidil.

Prescription medications: Some prescription medications have proven effective in helping women with FPHL grow hair and prevent FPHL from worsening. 

To date, these medications have received FDA approval to treat other conditions, but not FPHL. Doctors often prescribe FDA-approved medications to treat medical conditions other than those for which the drug was approved. 

A dermatologist may prescribe one of the following medications to treat FPHL. Each of these medications is a pill. 

Spironolactone (speh-ren-no-LAK-tone): This medication is a diuretic, which has been prescribed for decades to treat hair loss. It is a common treatment for FPHL because it can help restore hair growth and prevent hair loss from worsening. 

Before taking spironolactone, be sure to tell your dermatologist about your medical conditions, including kidney and adrenal gland problems. Also, be sure that your dermatologist knows all the medications and supplements you take.

Your dermatologist may prescribe another medication to treat FPHL, such as finasteride (fi-NAS-ter-ide), flutamide(flu-TA-mide), or dutasteride (doo-TAS-ter-ide).

With any medication, side effects are possible. Ask your dermatologist about possible side effects that you might experience while taking one of these medications.

When will I see results? If your dermatologist prescribes one of these medications, you’ll need to take it for 6 to 12 months before you’ll know if it works for you. No hair growth within 12 months means the medication won’t work for you. 

Like minoxidil, once you stop taking a prescription medication, you lose the hair that grew. This happens in about three to four months. 

Women who are pregnant or may become pregnant should not take prescription hair-loss medicines.

Pregnancy and hair-loss medications: All of these prescription medications may cause birth defects, so none of these is an option for women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. 

Dermatologists recommend that all pre-menopausal women use birth control while taking one of these prescription medications. 

Hair transplant: Long used to treat hair loss in men, a hair transplant may be an option for some women with FPHL.

The hair transplant has come a long way since the days of hair plugs. Today, most hair transplants look completely natural.

Not everyone is a good candidate for a hair transplant though. If the hair on your scalp is sparse all over, you may not have enough healthy hair to transplant. A hair transplant surgeon, many of whom are dermatologists, can tell you if a hair transplant may help restore your hair.

Are there other treatment options for FPHL? 

Women want innovative treatments for FPHL. To meet this need, researchers continue to look for new ways to stimulate hair growth and stop hair breakage. Other treatments that you may find for FPHL include the following.

Lasers for at-home use: The FDA has approved laser combs, helmets, and other devices, which are available without a prescription, to treat hair loss at home. These devices emit a low level of laser light that may help stimulate new hair growth. A few studies show that this can be effective for treating FPHL. 

As with minoxidil and prescription medicines, you must continue using an at-home laser device to see results. We still do not know whether these devices are safe for long-term use or if they can continue to produce new hair growth. 

women relaxing in a chair.
Preliminary research shows that blood-platelet therapy may help with female hair loss.

Platelet-rich plasma therapy: This therapy uses your own blood. After a blood draw, the blood is placed into a machine that separates the blood into its different components. The platelets, which are a type of blood cell, are treated and injected into your scalp. 

It is believed the platelets help stimulate your cells to grow hair. 

Researchers are just beginning to study this therapy as a treatment for hair loss. The early findings show promise, but more studies are needed to know whether this is a safe and effective treatment for FPHL. 

Stem cells: Using stem cells to treat FPHL is still in the experimental stages. Like platelet-rich plasma therapy, more studies are needed to know whether stem cells are a safe and effective treatment for FPHL. 

Supplements: Many supplements, including biotin and folic acid, are said to help grow and thicken hair. In studying these different supplements, the findings have been mixed. In most studies, the supplements had no effect on hair growth and thickness. 

In one study, however, 120 healthy women had thicker hair and less hair loss after taking specific omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids, and antioxidants. They took this combination for six months. If these results can be repeated in other studies, we’ll have some evidence to recommend taking these supplements. 

In the meantime, you’re sure to find supplements that promise to regrow hair. Before taking any of these, it’s best to check with your dermatologist. Some supplements can interact with medications. Your dermatologist can also tell you whether we have any evidence to show that the supplement helps regrow hair. 

Hair loss shampoos: These shampoos tend to do one of the following.

  • Help your hair hold moisture, which makes hair look fuller and thicker 
  • Lessen breakage, which can reduce thinning

While hair loss shampoos may do the above, they cannot regrow hair or prevent hair loss from worsening.

A dermatologist’s diagnosis is best before treating hair loss

If you think you have FPHL, it’s important to see a dermatologist for a diagnosis. Women develop hair loss for many reasons. Other common causes of hair loss in women can look a lot like FPHL. Each of these causes requires different treatment. Without the right treatment, hair loss often continues.

You can find a dermatologist in your area by going to Find a Dermatologist.

Key points

  • See a dermatologist to make sure that you have FPHL, and to rule out another condition, which may be causing your hair loss
  • Treatment works best when started at the first sign of hair loss
  • Minoxidil is the most-recommended treatment for FPHL

Whether the newer treatments for hair loss, such as the lasers for at-home use, are safe for long-term use and can continue to stimulate new hair growth remain to be seen.


This may help HERE

Vitamin B3

What does vitamin b3 do?

Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is an important nutrient. In fact, every part of your body needs it to function properly. As a supplement, niacin may help lower cholesterol, ease arthritis and boost brain function, among other benefits. However, it can also cause serious side effects if you take large doses.

What foods are high in vitamin b3?

8 Foods That Are High in Niacin (Vitamin B3)

  • Liver. Liver is one of the best natural sources of niacin. …
  • Chicken Breast. Chicken, especially the breast meat, is a good source of both niacin and lean protein. …
  • Tuna. Tuna is a good source of niacin and a great option for people who eat fish but not meat. …
  • Turkey. …
  • Salmon. …
  • Anchovies. …
  • Pork. …
  • Ground Beef.

What are the symptoms of vitamin b3 deficiency?

They include:

  • thick, scaly pigmented rash on skin exposed to sunlight.
  • swollen mouth and bright red tongue.
  • vomiting and diarrhea.
  • headache.
  • apathy.
  • fatigue.
  • depression.
  • disorientation.

How much vitamin b3 should I take?

How much niacin (vitamin b3) should you take?

  1. Children: between 2-16 milligrams daily, depending on age.
  2. Men: 16 milligrams daily.
  3. Women: 14 milligrams daily.
  4. Women (pregnant): 18 milligrams daily.
  5. Women (breastfeeding): 17 milligrams daily.
  6. Maximum daily intake for adults of all ages: 35 milligrams daily.
Learn More at TruNiagen.com

What Are Essential Oils?

Do They Work?

Essential oils are compounds extracted from plants.

The oils capture the plant’s scent and flavor, also called its “essence.”

Unique aromatic compounds give each essential oil its characteristic essence.

Essential oils are obtained through distillation (via steam and/or water) or mechanical methods, such as cold pressing.

Once the aromatic chemicals have been extracted, they are combined with a carrier oil to create a product that’s ready for use.

The way the oils are made is important, as essential oils obtained through chemical processes are not considered true essential oils.

BOTTOM LINE:Essential oils are concentrated plant extracts that retain the natural smell and flavor, or “essence,” of their source.

Essential oils are most commonly used in the practice of aromatherapy. They are either inhaled, or diluted then rubbed on the skin.

Essential oils are not meant to be swallowed.

The chemicals in essential oils can interact with your body in a number of ways.

When applied to your skin, some plant chemicals are absorbed.

It’s thought that certain methods can improve absorption, such as applying with heat or to different areas of the body. However, research in this area is lacking.

Inhaling the aromas from essential oils can stimulate areas of your limbic system, which is a part of your brain that plays a role in emotions, behaviors, sense of smell and long-term memory .

Interestingly, the limbic system is heavily involved in forming memories. This can partly explain why familiar smells can trigger memories or emotions

The limbic system also plays a role in controlling some unconscious physiological functions, such as breathing, heart rate and blood pressure. Some people claim that essential oils can exert a physical effect on your body in this way.

However, this has yet to be confirmed in studies.

Read more HERE

Lavender & Comfrey Hair & Body Bar

Our luxurious, handcrafted organic Lavender & Comfrey Hair & Body Bar will detox and beautify your hair and skin.

Lavender’s fresh, floral scent has a soothing effect on both the skin and the senses, while Comfrey contains Allantoin, a natural skin cell regenerator, to help restore your skin to its natural balance and glow. Perfect for all skin & hair types.

Read more…