Introducing SOL✿CBD Skin Care:

Exquisite, Organic Care for Your Skin

Experience the luxury and rejuvenation of essential oils and pure organic ingredients revitalizing your skin with our limited production skin care. 

Indulge yourself, and rediscover your most exquisite skin with 2 amazing products.

Nourishing Organic Oils Your Skin Loves + CBD

Our “NOURISH” formula is specially designed to work for skin that is in good shape already – but needs maintaining. If you’re happy with your skin at the moment but want to keep it in the best glowing shape, prevent any deterioration, and avoid future signs of aging, this is the perfect formula for you.

Healing Organic Oils Your Skin Needs + CBD

The “EXTRA CARE” formula is created to address skin that needs a little more help. So, for example, if you are struggling with blemishes, spots, creases or other signs of wear and tear, and need some serious repair and replenishing, this would be the perfect cream for you. It has twice the amount of CBD and is more intensive. Serious healing power.

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Turmeric Curcumin

What does Turmeric Curcumin do?

Turmeric and especially its most active compound curcumin have many scientifically-proven health benefits, such as the potential to prevent heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer. It’s a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant and may also help improve symptoms of depression and arthritis.

Turmeric Curcumin

How much turmeric curcumin should I take?

“If you want anti-inflammatory effects you need to get 500 to 1,000 milligrams of curcuminoids per day.” When using the spice on its own, the common rule of thumb is that there are 200 milligrams of curcumin in one teaspoon of fresh or ground turmeric (though it varies a bit depending on the source and origins).

What medicines should not be taken with turmeric?

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use turmeric or curcumin in medicinal forms without first talking to your health care provider.

Interactions

  • Cimetidine (Tagamet)
  • Famotidine (Pepcid)
  • Ranitidine (Zantac)
  • Esomeprazole (Nexium)
  • Omeprazole.
  • Lansoprazole (Prevacid)

Is it safe to take turmeric every day?

Turmeric is safe for most people when consumed in amounts found in food. But turmeric can have side effects when taken in large doses. Some supplements contain up to 500 milligrams of turmeric extract, and their labels recommend taking four capsules per day. … Little research has been done on excessive doses of turmeric.

Does turmeric lower blood pressure?

Turmeric is a natural blood pressure reducer and cardiovascular spice that has been used for years. Curcumin is a powerful antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties that help lower blood pressure by lowering the excess platelet aggregation that occurs in sticky, clot-forming blood.

Is turmeric good for hair?

There are many possible reasons for a dry, itchy scalp, but often turmeric can come to the rescue. “The antiseptic and anti-inflammatory qualities that it contains can help soothe and rid dandruff,” Punnapuzha says. … Punnapuzha notes that it’s best on dark hair, since turmeric can stain blonde or light-hued hair.

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What is Niacinamide?

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Also known as vitamin B3 and nicotinamide, niacinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that works with the natural substances in your skin to help visibly improve enlarged pores, uneven skin tone, fine lines and wrinkles, dullness, and a weakened surface.

Niacinamide also reduces the impact of environmental damage because of its ability to improve skin’s barrier (its first line of defense), plus it also plays a role in helping skin to repair signs of past damage. Left unchecked, this type of daily assault makes skin appear older, dull, and less radiant.

Why You Should Use Niacinamide

As you might have gathered, we’re very impressed with all that niacinamide can do for skin when applied via skin care products like toners, serums, and highly concentrated skin care boosters. Niacinamide is uniquely compatible with any of the products in your skin care routine, including those that contain retinol, peptides, hyaluronic acid, AHAs, BHA, vitamin C, and all types of antioxidants.

You can use multiple niacinamide-containing products in your routine, and it will still be non-sensitizing as this ingenious B vitamin is well tolerated by all skin types. It’s even suitable for use by those with sensitive or rosacea-prone skin.

Other helpful benefits of niacinamide are that it helps renew and restore the surface of skin against moisture loss and dehydration by helping skin improve its natural production of skin-strengthening ceramides. When ceramides become depleted over time, skin is left vulnerable to all sorts of problems, from persistent patches of dry, flaky skin to increasingly becoming extra-sensitive.

If you struggle with dry skin, topical application of niacinamide has been shown to boost the hydrating ability of moisturizers so skin’s surface can better resist the moisture loss that leads to recurrent dry, tight, flaky skin. Niacinamide works brilliantly with common moisturizer ingredients like glycerin, non-fragrant plant oils, cholesterol, sodium PCA, and sodium hyaluronate.

How does niacinamide help pores? Great question, although the answer here isn’t certain. Simply put, research hasn’t come to a full understanding about how this B vitamin works its pore-reducing magic, but it does! It seems that niacinamide has a normalizing ability on the pore lining, and that this influence plays a role in keeping debris from getting backed up, which leads to clogs and rough, bumpy skin. As the clog forms and worsens, the pores stretch to compensate, and what you’ll see is enlarged pores. By helping things get back to normal, niacinamide use helps pores return to their normal size.

How to Use Niacinamide

Using niacinamide is as easy as finding great skin care products that contain it along with other beneficial ingredients like antioxidants, skin-restoring agents, and other skin-replenishing ingredients.

This multi-ingredient approach to skin care is important because as great as niacinamide is for skin, it’s not the only ingredient skin needs to look and feel its best. Think of it like your diet—as healthy as kale is, if kale was all you ate, you’d soon become malnourished because your body needs more than one healthy food to maintain itself. The same is true for skin, the body’s largest (and most exposed) organ!

For best results, use leave-on products with niacinamide and apply them to cleansed skin twice daily. That might mean you apply a toner with niacinamide immediately after cleansing to rehydrate and replenish skin. You could also try a niacinamide serum as part of your morning routine, before sunscreen. Our 10% Niacinamide Booster can be used on its own (much like a serum) or mixed into your favorite moisturizer, based on personal preference. Experiment to see what works best for your skin!

You can use niacinamide-containing products around your eyes, too. Some might find applying a moisturizer or eye cream with niacinamide helps improve the look of under eye circles, helps soften the appearance of crow’s feet, not to mention enables this delicate area to retain skin-smoothing moisture and resist loss of firmness.

There’s no reason to wait to add niacinamide to your skin care routine. This wonderfully versatile B vitamin brings many topical benefits to improve skin’s appearance, so it appears more even, brighter, and younger. As with any great skin care ingredient, it’s important to be diligent about protecting skin daily with a broad-spectrum sunscreen rated SPF 30 or greater. This allows you to get maximum benefit from niacinamide and other proven skin savers.

How Niacinamide Helps Skin

Niacinamide is a skin care ingredient worthy of your attention and your skin will love you for using it. Among a handful of other amazing skin care ingredients such as retinol and vitamin C, niacinamide is a standout because of its versatility for almost any skin care concern and skin type.

As many of you know about us, but for those who don’t, the conclusions we make about any ingredient are always based on what the published research has shown to be true—and the research about niacinamide unanimously demonstrates how special it is. New research keeps showing it’s one of the most exciting skin care ingredients around.

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Your Sniffles May be More Than a Cold

“Am I getting sick?”  

If the symptoms linger, there’s no getting around it—you’ve come down with something. The next question is, what? Recognizing when your illness is mild, like a cold, or when it’s more serious, like the flu or even pneumonia, is crucial. While a cold might mean some extra rest and a day or two off work, the flu can require medical attention, and pneumonia is a more serious problem.  

The good news is there are distinct differences between the symptoms of a cold, the flu, and pneumonia. While these indicators may not be fool-proof, they can serve as a good starting point for a conversation with your doctor

1. Pinpoint where your symptoms are

The location of your worst symptoms can be a tell-tale sign of what ails you. Here’s a basic breakdown: 

· In your head (eyes, nose, or throat)—you likely have a cold. If your symptoms stop at a runny nose, and a sore throat, there’s a good chance you are suffering from the common cold. These symptoms are often confused with seasonal allergies, but here’s another good rule of thumb—if you have a sore throat, it’s more likely a cold than allergies. 

· In your whole body—you likely have the flu. Aches throughout your body, feeling really run down, and a fever indicate you have something more serious than a cold – you probably have the flu.  

· In your chest—you may have pneumonia. There’s a lot of overlap with symptoms of pneumonia and symptoms of cold and flu. Fever and chills can also be a sign of pneumonia, but sharp pain in your chest that occurs with taking a breath, along with issues like difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, are potential indicators of pneumonia. Pay close attention to chest pain that occurs when taking a breath and is worse on one side of your body than the other. 

2. Check the calendar

Colds are most common in the transitions into fall and spring, while flu season typically picks up a little bit later (often in October running through February and sometimes as late as May). While there is considerable overlap, far fewer people suffer from the flu outside of this season. 

Because pneumonia is a common complication stemming from the flu and can result from colds as well, it tends to share seasonality with these illnesses.  

3. Look at your tissue

It might not be the most pleasant thing, but opening that used tissue back up can provide some clues about what ails you. If you have a cold or the flu, your mucus will start off clear and could potentially change colors to white, yellowish or green as your body fights the infection.  

But large amounts of yellow mucus, especially right after you first start experiencing symptoms, could be a sign of bacterial infection. Lots of phlegm in the chest, resulting in what doctors call a “productive cough,” could also be an indicator of pneumonia. 

I think I have a cold, the flu, or pneumonia—what should I do next? 

If you think you have the common cold, over-the-counter medicines may curb your symptoms, but there’s little you can do to speed up your recovery time. Your best bet is to stay hydrated and get some rest. Taking some time off work and washing your hands frequently can reduce spread of the virus.  

If you think you might have the flu, get to the doctor or urgent care center. Unlike a cold, there are drugs to treat the flu virus, and these drugs are most effective within the first 48 hours of the infection. Getting to a doctor is especially important for people with chronic conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), people who have weakened immune systems, and women who are pregnant. Antibiotics are not effective against the common cold or the flu, and could actually make things worse. 

People who suspect they may have pneumonia, particularly those who are short of breath, should visit an urgent care or emergency department. Antibiotics are often used as treatment for pneumonia.  

When you first start experiencing symptoms, differentiating between a cold, the flu, and pneumonia isn’t always easy or straightforward. Fortunately, a health care professional can usually give you a better idea of what’s going on. Pay close attention to your symptoms and don’t wait to see a medical professional if you think it may be something beyond the sniffles. 

Get help HERE

The History of Resveratrol

Resveratrol was first identified in 1939 by a Japanese researcher Dr. Michio Takaoka. It was isolated in the roots of a Japanese plant known as white hellebore. Years later, in 1963, another Japanese scientist isolated resveratrol from Japanese knotweed. The roots of Japanese knotweed had been used in traditional medicine to treat cardiovascular diseases, inflammation and liver diseases. Plants containing resveratrol have been used in traditional medicine for over 2,000 years.

The presence of resveratrol in grapevines wasn’t discovered until 1976. The fact that it’s in wine wasn’t found out until as recently as 1992 by Siemann and Creasy of Cornell University. This realization led to the widespread speculation of wine consumption solving the “French Paradox”. The French Paradox describes the ability the French have to consume a diet rich in saturated fats yet still remain thin.

More recently, scientists from the Harvard Medical School have found that resveratrol can increase the lifespan of yeasts cells and species such as worms and fruit flies. The research on resveratrol and increased lifespan in mammals and humans, however, has been inconclusive so far and therefore largely debated.

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NAD+ Cell Regenerator

DESCRIPTION

  • NAD+ Cell Regenerator™
  • 100 mg, 30 vegetarian capsules

NAD+ Cell Regenerator™ promotes systemic youthful functions and boosts healthy cellular metabolism with a clinically studied dose of NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside — a patented compound that helps inhibit the age-related decline in NAD+,1-4 a coenzyme critical to healthy cellular metabolism.

Benefits at a Glance:

  • Supports healthy cellular metabolism and energy production5
  • Encourages youthful levels of NAD+6
  • Promotes youthful cognitive function in pre-clinical studies5,7
  • Supports healthy aging

More facts about NAD+Cell Regenerator

If you are experiencing general fatigue and lack of motivation, it may be due to the age-related decline in NAD+ levels. NAD+ is found in every cell in your body,8 where it facilitates youthful, healthy cellular energy metabolism and other systemic youthful functions.9 This is our Best Seller formula for promoting youthful levels of NAD+ and, with it, youthful cellular metabolism and energy.

NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside

NIAGEN® increases cellular levels of NAD+, a coenzyme critical to healthy cellular energy production. This unique coenzyme is necessary to create adenosine triphosphate (ATP) — the compound your body uses for fuel.10

In a randomized controlled trial published in 2017, older adults taking a daily dose of a formula that contained 250 mg of nicotinamide riboside led to a 40% increase in NAD+ levels after just 30 days.6 Evidence from preclinical studies indicates that increasing NAD+ also encourages healthy metabolic and cognitive function.5,7

Systemic youthful functions
NAD+ Cell Regenerator™ also promotes the activity of sirtuin (SIRT1 and SIRT3), essential proteins that work with NAD+ to promote healthy aging.11 It also enhances production and function of mitochondria5 — the cellular powerhouses that provide the energy you need to thrive.

LIONEL R LIZEE

October 22, 2016: This is an amazing vitamin. Expensive, but well worth it. I share a very tiny bit with my fourteen year old dog, who behaves more and more like a two year old. If so little does so much for him, imagine what it does for me. And I do feel much better. Memory problems are a thing of the past. More energy. This brand had 25% more of the nicontinimide riboside than the others.

More information HERE