Sustainable Cognitive Endurance Throughout Your Day

Brain Pill is not for anyone hopelessly searching for an elusive “Magic Pill

Sorry, this won’t turn you into Superman.

This is for success-driven individuals… who need to grind out a lot of work without being stopped by brain fog or mental fatigue.

Brain Pill is not for someone looking for a cheap, quick “pick-me-up”

There’s no caffeine or dirty stimulants hidden in our powerful nootropic formula.

Instead, Brain Pill was specifically designed for peak performers who need long-term sustainable mental performance… to give you that mental edge all day long.

Brain Pill
The Brain Pill

THE ROCK SOLID SCIENCE BEHIND
this New Cognitive Breakthrough

Brain Pill is tailor-made to give you peak mental performance under any stressful circumstance.

That’s why we didn’t mess around with unproven “brain boosters” when formulating Brain Pill’s unique blend.

Our research and development team worked tirelessly… pouring over reams of research and clinical studies… searching for the most proven nootropics available.

Here’s the 3-tiered clinical-grade criteria checklist each nootropic had to meet… or exceed… before being considered an option for Brain Pills amazing formula:

  • 1. Clinically testing & approved to enhance cognitive function
  • 1. Clinically confirming no side-effects
  • 1. 100% natural & safe for long-term use

There were a lot of options… but after narrowing down our search… we found 13 potent nootropics that caught our eye.

We quickly got down to business engineering the ultimate Brain Pill.

So when you’re taking Brain Pill… you’re getting by far the most researched and clinically proven nootropics!

For an in-depth peek into our complete nootropic formulation… then check out the Ingredients and Scientific Studies pages at the top.

Here’s what you can expect:

  • Razor sharp focus in times when you need it most
  • The ability to jump from task to task without skipping a beat
  • A steady flow of mental energy charging your brain throughout the day
  • Plan, problem solve and make important decisions with more ease and clarity
  • Higher levels of motivation to tackle your workload
  • Extra brain power when you really need to put on the gas
  • Higher levels of concentration and mental alertness
  • Impressive critical thinking skills
  • Increased ability to learn and remember critical information
  • Faster thinking and quicker recall than before
  • And a whole lot more!
Click the Order Now button for peak mental performance
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Your Sniffles May be More Than a Cold

“Am I getting sick?”  

If the symptoms linger, there’s no getting around it—you’ve come down with something. The next question is, what? Recognizing when your illness is mild, like a cold, or when it’s more serious, like the flu or even pneumonia, is crucial. While a cold might mean some extra rest and a day or two off work, the flu can require medical attention, and pneumonia is a more serious problem.  

The good news is there are distinct differences between the symptoms of a cold, the flu, and pneumonia. While these indicators may not be fool-proof, they can serve as a good starting point for a conversation with your doctor

1. Pinpoint where your symptoms are

The location of your worst symptoms can be a tell-tale sign of what ails you. Here’s a basic breakdown: 

· In your head (eyes, nose, or throat)—you likely have a cold. If your symptoms stop at a runny nose, and a sore throat, there’s a good chance you are suffering from the common cold. These symptoms are often confused with seasonal allergies, but here’s another good rule of thumb—if you have a sore throat, it’s more likely a cold than allergies. 

· In your whole body—you likely have the flu. Aches throughout your body, feeling really run down, and a fever indicate you have something more serious than a cold – you probably have the flu.  

· In your chest—you may have pneumonia. There’s a lot of overlap with symptoms of pneumonia and symptoms of cold and flu. Fever and chills can also be a sign of pneumonia, but sharp pain in your chest that occurs with taking a breath, along with issues like difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, are potential indicators of pneumonia. Pay close attention to chest pain that occurs when taking a breath and is worse on one side of your body than the other. 

2. Check the calendar

Colds are most common in the transitions into fall and spring, while flu season typically picks up a little bit later (often in October running through February and sometimes as late as May). While there is considerable overlap, far fewer people suffer from the flu outside of this season. 

Because pneumonia is a common complication stemming from the flu and can result from colds as well, it tends to share seasonality with these illnesses.  

3. Look at your tissue

It might not be the most pleasant thing, but opening that used tissue back up can provide some clues about what ails you. If you have a cold or the flu, your mucus will start off clear and could potentially change colors to white, yellowish or green as your body fights the infection.  

But large amounts of yellow mucus, especially right after you first start experiencing symptoms, could be a sign of bacterial infection. Lots of phlegm in the chest, resulting in what doctors call a “productive cough,” could also be an indicator of pneumonia. 

I think I have a cold, the flu, or pneumonia—what should I do next? 

If you think you have the common cold, over-the-counter medicines may curb your symptoms, but there’s little you can do to speed up your recovery time. Your best bet is to stay hydrated and get some rest. Taking some time off work and washing your hands frequently can reduce spread of the virus.  

If you think you might have the flu, get to the doctor or urgent care center. Unlike a cold, there are drugs to treat the flu virus, and these drugs are most effective within the first 48 hours of the infection. Getting to a doctor is especially important for people with chronic conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), people who have weakened immune systems, and women who are pregnant. Antibiotics are not effective against the common cold or the flu, and could actually make things worse. 

People who suspect they may have pneumonia, particularly those who are short of breath, should visit an urgent care or emergency department. Antibiotics are often used as treatment for pneumonia.  

When you first start experiencing symptoms, differentiating between a cold, the flu, and pneumonia isn’t always easy or straightforward. Fortunately, a health care professional can usually give you a better idea of what’s going on. Pay close attention to your symptoms and don’t wait to see a medical professional if you think it may be something beyond the sniffles. 

Get help HERE

7 Tips for Healthy Eating

These 7 practical tips cover the basics of healthy eating and can help you make healthier choices.

The key to a healthy diet is to eat the right amount of calories for how active you are so you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use.

If you eat or drink more than your body needs, you’ll put on weight because the energy you do not use is stored as fat. If you eat and drink too little, you’ll lose weight.

You should also eat a wide range of foods to make sure you’re getting a balanced diet and your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

It’s recommended that men have around 2,500 calories a day (10,500 kilojoules). Women should have around 2,000 calories a day (8,400 kilojoules).

Most adults in the UK are eating more calories than they need and should eat fewer calories.

1. Base your meals on higher fibre starchy carbohydrates

Starchy carbohydrates should make up just over a third of the food you eat. They include potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and cereals.

Choose higher fibre or wholegrain varieties, such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice or potatoes with their skins on.

They contain more fibre than white or refined starchy carbohydrates and can help you feel full for longer.

Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal. Some people think starchy foods are fattening, but gram for gram the carbohydrate they contain provides fewer than half the calories of fat.

Keep an eye on the fats you add when you’re cooking or serving these types of foods because that’s what increases the calorie content – for example, oil on chips, butter on bread and creamy sauces on pasta.

2. Eat lots of fruit and veg

It’s recommended that you eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and veg every day. They can be fresh, frozen, canned, dried or juiced.

Getting your 5 A Day is easier than it sounds. Why not chop a banana over your breakfast cereal, or swap your usual mid-morning snack for a piece of fresh fruit?

A portion of fresh, canned or frozen fruit and vegetables is 80g. A portion of dried fruit (which should be kept to mealtimes) is 30g.

A 150ml glass of fruit juice, vegetable juice or smoothie also counts as 1 portion, but limit the amount you have to no more than 1 glass a day as these drinks are sugary and can damage your teeth.

3. Eat more fish, including a portion of oily fish

Fish is a good source of protein and contains many vitamins and minerals.

Aim to eat at least 2 portions of fish a week, including at least 1 portion of oily fish.

Oily fish are high in omega-3 fats, which may help prevent heart disease. 

Oily fish include:

  • salmon
  • trout
  • herring
  • sardines
  • pilchards
  • mackerel

Non-oily fish include:

  • haddock
  • plaice
  • coley
  • cod
  • tuna
  • skate
  • hake

You can choose from fresh, frozen and canned, but remember that canned and smoked fish can be high in salt.

Most people should be eating more fish, but there are recommended limits for some types of fish.

Find out more about fish and shellfish

4. Cut down on saturated fat and sugar

Saturated fat

You need some fat in your diet, but it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat you’re eating.

There are 2 main types of fat: saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease.

On average, men should have no more than 30g of saturated fat a day. On average, women should have no more than 20g of saturated fat a day.

Children under the age of 11 should have less saturated fat than adults, but a low-fat diet is not suitable for children under 5.

Saturated fat is found in many foods, such as:

Try to cut down on your saturated fat intake and choose foods that contain unsaturated fats instead, such as vegetable oils and spreads, oily fish and avocados.

For a healthier choice, use a small amount of vegetable or olive oil, or reduced-fat spread instead of butter, lard or ghee.

When you’re having meat, choose lean cuts and cut off any visible fat.

All types of fat are high in energy, so they should only be eaten in small amounts.

Sugar

Regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay.

Sugary foods and drinks are often high in energy (measured in kilojoules or calories), and if consumed too often can contribute to weight gain. They can also cause tooth decay, especially if eaten between meals.

Free sugars are any sugars added to foods or drinks, or found naturally in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices and smoothies.

This is the type of sugar you should be cutting down on, rather than the sugar found in fruit and milk.

Many packaged foods and drinks contain surprisingly high amounts of free sugars.

Free sugars are found in many foods, such as:

Food labels can help. Use them to check how much sugar foods contain.

More than 22.5g of total sugars per 100g means the food is high in sugar, while 5g of total sugars or less per 100g means the food is low in sugar.

Get tips on cutting down on sugar in your diet

5. Eat less salt: no more than 6g a day for adults

Eating too much salt can raise your blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke.

Even if you do not add salt to your food, you may still be eating too much.

About three-quarters of the salt you eat is already in the food when you buy it, such as breakfast cereals, soups, breads and sauces.

Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt.

Adults and children aged 11 and over should eat no more than 6g of salt (about a teaspoonful) a day. Younger children should have even less.

Get tips on cutting down on salt in your diet

6. Get active and be a healthy weight

As well as eating healthily, regular exercise may help reduce your risk of getting serious health conditions. It’s also important for your overall health and wellbeing.

Read more about the benefits of exercise and physical activity guidelines for adults.

Being overweight or obese can lead to health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease and stroke. Being underweight could also affect your health.

Most adults need to lose weight by eating fewer calories.

If you’re trying to lose weight, aim to eat less and be more active. Eating a healthy, balanced diet can help you maintain a healthy weight.

Check whether you’re a healthy weight by using the BMI healthy weight calculator.

Start the NHS weight loss plan, a 12-week weight loss guide that combines advice on healthier eating and physical activity.

If you’re underweight, see underweight adults. If you’re worried about your weight, ask your GP or a dietitian for advice.

7. Do not get thirsty

You need to drink plenty of fluids to stop you getting dehydrated. The government recommends drinking 6 to 8 glasses every day. This is in addition to the fluid you get from the food you eat. 

All non-alcoholic drinks count, but water, lower fat milk and lower sugar drinks, including tea and coffee, are healthier choices. 

Try to avoid sugary soft and fizzy drinks, as they’re high in calories. They’re also bad for your teeth. 

Even unsweetened fruit juice and smoothies are high in free sugar.

Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies should not be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass.

Remember to drink more fluids during hot weather or while exercising.

More Tips HERE

The History of Resveratrol

Resveratrol was first identified in 1939 by a Japanese researcher Dr. Michio Takaoka. It was isolated in the roots of a Japanese plant known as white hellebore. Years later, in 1963, another Japanese scientist isolated resveratrol from Japanese knotweed. The roots of Japanese knotweed had been used in traditional medicine to treat cardiovascular diseases, inflammation and liver diseases. Plants containing resveratrol have been used in traditional medicine for over 2,000 years.

The presence of resveratrol in grapevines wasn’t discovered until 1976. The fact that it’s in wine wasn’t found out until as recently as 1992 by Siemann and Creasy of Cornell University. This realization led to the widespread speculation of wine consumption solving the “French Paradox”. The French Paradox describes the ability the French have to consume a diet rich in saturated fats yet still remain thin.

More recently, scientists from the Harvard Medical School have found that resveratrol can increase the lifespan of yeasts cells and species such as worms and fruit flies. The research on resveratrol and increased lifespan in mammals and humans, however, has been inconclusive so far and therefore largely debated.

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NAD+ Cell Regenerator

DESCRIPTION

  • NAD+ Cell Regenerator™
  • 100 mg, 30 vegetarian capsules

NAD+ Cell Regenerator™ promotes systemic youthful functions and boosts healthy cellular metabolism with a clinically studied dose of NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside — a patented compound that helps inhibit the age-related decline in NAD+,1-4 a coenzyme critical to healthy cellular metabolism.

Benefits at a Glance:

  • Supports healthy cellular metabolism and energy production5
  • Encourages youthful levels of NAD+6
  • Promotes youthful cognitive function in pre-clinical studies5,7
  • Supports healthy aging

More facts about NAD+Cell Regenerator

If you are experiencing general fatigue and lack of motivation, it may be due to the age-related decline in NAD+ levels. NAD+ is found in every cell in your body,8 where it facilitates youthful, healthy cellular energy metabolism and other systemic youthful functions.9 This is our Best Seller formula for promoting youthful levels of NAD+ and, with it, youthful cellular metabolism and energy.

NIAGEN® nicotinamide riboside

NIAGEN® increases cellular levels of NAD+, a coenzyme critical to healthy cellular energy production. This unique coenzyme is necessary to create adenosine triphosphate (ATP) — the compound your body uses for fuel.10

In a randomized controlled trial published in 2017, older adults taking a daily dose of a formula that contained 250 mg of nicotinamide riboside led to a 40% increase in NAD+ levels after just 30 days.6 Evidence from preclinical studies indicates that increasing NAD+ also encourages healthy metabolic and cognitive function.5,7

Systemic youthful functions
NAD+ Cell Regenerator™ also promotes the activity of sirtuin (SIRT1 and SIRT3), essential proteins that work with NAD+ to promote healthy aging.11 It also enhances production and function of mitochondria5 — the cellular powerhouses that provide the energy you need to thrive.

LIONEL R LIZEE

October 22, 2016: This is an amazing vitamin. Expensive, but well worth it. I share a very tiny bit with my fourteen year old dog, who behaves more and more like a two year old. If so little does so much for him, imagine what it does for me. And I do feel much better. Memory problems are a thing of the past. More energy. This brand had 25% more of the nicontinimide riboside than the others.

More information HERE

5 Reasons You’re Always Tired

Young depressed women sitting in bed with her hand on face

1. Living a Sedentary Lifestyle

Inactivity could be the root cause of your low energy.

But many people say they’re too tired to exercise.

In fact, in one recent study, this was the most common reason that middle-aged and older adults gave for not exercising.

One explanation could be chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), which is characterized by extreme, unexplained fatigue on a daily basis.

Research suggests people with CFS tend to have low strength and endurance levels, which limit their exercise ability. However, a review of studies including more than 1,500 people found that exercise may reduce fatigue in those with CFS.

Research has also shown that exercising can reduce fatigue among healthy people and those with other illnesses, such as cancer. What’s more, even minimal increases in physical activity seem to be beneficial.

To boost your energy levels, replace sedentary behaviors with active ones. For instance, stand rather than sit down whenever possible, take the stairs instead of the elevator and walk instead of driving short distances.

SUMMARY:Being sedentary can lead to fatigue in healthy people, as well as those with chronic fatigue syndrome or other health problems. Being more active can help boost energy levels.

2. Not Getting Enough High-Quality Sleep

Not getting enough sleep is one of the more obvious causes of fatigue.

Your body does many things while you sleep, including store memory and release hormones that regulate your metabolism and energy levels.

After a night of high-quality sleep, you typically wake up feeling refreshed, alert and energized.

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society, adults need an average of seven hours of sleep per night for optimal health.

Importantly, sleep should be restful and uninterrupted in order to allow your brain to go through all five stages of each sleep cycle.

In addition to getting enough sleep, maintaining a regular sleep routine also seems to help prevent tiredness.

In one study, adolescents who went to bed at the same time on weekdays and weekends reported less fatigue and less difficulty falling asleep than those who stayed up later and slept fewer hours on the weekends.

Being physically active during the day may help you get more restorative sleep at night. One study in older people found that exercising helped improve their sleep quality and reduce levels of fatigue.

Furthermore, napping may help boost energy levels. Taking naps has been shown to decrease tiredness in pilots, who often experience fatigue due to long working hours and jet lag.

To improve the amount and quality of your sleep, go to bed at roughly the same time every night, relax before sleeping and get plenty of activity during the day.

However, if you find it difficult to fall or stay asleep and suspect you may have a sleeping disorder, speak to your doctor about having your sleep evaluated by a specialist.

3. Food Sensitivities

Food sensitivities or intolerances typically cause symptoms like rashes, digestive problems, runny nose or headaches.

But fatigue is another symptom that’s often overlooked.

Also, research suggests that quality of life may be more affected by fatigue in those with food sensitivities.

Common food intolerances include gluten, dairy, eggs, soy and corn.

If you suspect that certain foods may be making you tired, consider working with an allergist or dietitian who can test you for food sensitivities or prescribe an elimination diet to determine which foods are problematic.

SUMMARY:Food intolerances can cause fatigue or low energy levels. Following a food elimination diet may help determine which foods you are sensitive to.

4. Not Eating Enough Calories

Consuming too few calories can cause feelings of exhaustion.

Calories are units of energy found in food. Your body uses them to move and fuel processes like breathing and maintaining a constant body temperature.

When you eat too few calories, your metabolism slows down in order to conserve energy, potentially causing fatigue.

Your body can function within a range of calories depending on your weight, height, age and other factors.

However, most people require a minimum of 1,200 calories per day to prevent a metabolic slowdown.

Experts on aging believe that although metabolism decreases with age, older people may need to eat at the top of their calorie range in order to perform normal functions without becoming fatigued.

In addition, it’s difficult to meet your vitamin and mineral needs when calorie intake is too low. Not getting enough vitamin D, iron and other important nutrients can also lead to fatigue.

In order to keep your energy levels up, avoid drastic cuts in calorie intake, even if your goal is weight loss. You can calculate your calorie needs using the calorie calculator in this article.

SUMMARY:Your body requires a minimum number of calories in order to perform daily functions. Consuming too few calories can lead to fatigue and make it difficult to meet nutrient needs.

5. Sleeping at the Wrong Time

In addition to inadequate sleep, sleeping at the wrong time can reduce your energy.

Sleeping during the day instead of at night disrupts your body’s circadian rhythm, which are the biological changes that occur in response to light and darkness during a 24-hour cycle.

Research has found that when your sleep pattern is out of sync with your circadian rhythm, chronic fatigue may develop.

This is a common problem among people who perform shift or night work.

Sleep experts estimate that 2–5% of all shift workers suffer from a sleep disorder characterized by excessive sleepiness or disrupted sleep over a period of one month or more.

What’s more, even staying awake during the night for a day or two can cause fatigue.

In one study, healthy young men were allowed to sleep either seven hours or just under five hours before being kept awake for 21–23 hours. Their fatigue ratings increased before and after sleep, regardless of the number of hours they slept.

It’s best to sleep during the night whenever possible.

However, if your job involves shift work, there are strategies to retrain your body clock, which should improve your energy levels.

In one study, shift workers reported significantly less fatigue and better mood after being exposed to bright light pulses, wearing dark sunglasses outside and sleeping in total darkness.

Using glasses to block blue light may also help people who perform shift work.

SUMMARY:Sleeping during the day can upset your body’s natural rhythm and lead to fatigue. Try to sleep at night or retrain your body clock.

This may help you! Here