Doctors Best Weight Loss

Doctors Best Weight Loss hasn’t always been the leading distributor of weight loss products.

FROM THE BEGINNING

Doctors Best Weight Loss began in December 2008 as a small, online store for basic weight loss food products. Not long after, we developed our three flagship brands NutriWise, Protiwise, and Doctors Best Weight Loss. We were committed to making sure these brands used top-quality formulations. Our customers were able to stop paying the high prices offered at weight loss clinics, and instead get the same products for a fraction of the cost by buying from us. 

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Dr Best Weight Loss
Weight Loss

MAKING NEW STRIDES

We have grown exponentially in the last 10 years, gaining more and more brands to bring you all of the best weight loss products we can find. We have helped thousands of people worldwide reach their weight loss goals and are constantly developing new resources to help you be the best YOU. We have recently gained the help our an in-house Nutritionist to help our customers find out exactly what products they need to succeed. 

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EDC Skin Care

EDC Skin Care
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EDCskincare.com is a skin care and makeup e-commerce site that was created to address the fact that our skins are all different, in look, tone, and texture. In addition, our skin care goals are distinct, acne prevention, anti-aging, firming, redness therapy, sun protection, and more. However, in all cases, achieving and maintaining youthful, healthy skin can be very straightforward with the proper skincare regimen. At EDCskincare.com, we are committed to delivering beauty.

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We take pride in the following: We carry only the most stringently formulated professional skincare brands. We source only directly from the manufacturers in the original factory seal and packaging to guarantee product authenticity. And, our expert staff are knowledgeable, experienced, and responsive in answering any questions regarding our products.

Since our launch in 2009, EDCskincare.com has grown to offer a range of more than 100 skin care and makeup brands, including NEOCUTIS, Vivier, NuFACE, Rodial, dermalogica, NIA24, glo SKIN BEAUTY, and many others.

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Aging Is Reversible

At Least in Human Cells and Live Mice.

New research suggests it is possible to slow or even reverse aging, at least in mice, by undoing changes in gene activity—the same kinds of changes that are caused by decades of life in humans.

By tweaking genes that turn adult cells back into embryoniclike ones, researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies reversed the aging of mouse and human cells in vitro, extended the life of a mouse with an accelerated-aging condition and successfully promoted recovery from an injury in a middle-aged mouse, according to a study published Thursday in Cell.

The study adds weight to the scientific argument that aging is largely a process of so-called epigenetic changes, alterations that make genes more active or less so. Over the course of life cell-activity regulators get added to or removed from genes. In humans those changes can be caused by smoking, pollution or other environmental factors—which dial the genes’ activities up or down. As these changes accumulate, our muscles weaken, our minds slow down and we become more vulnerable to diseases.

The new study suggests the possibility of reversing at least some of these changes, a process researchers think they may eventually get to work in living humans. “Aging is something plastic that we can manipulate,” says Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study’s senior author and an expert in gene expression at Salk. In their study Belmonte and his colleagues rejuvenated cells by turning on, for a short period of time, four genes that have the capacity to convert adult cells back into an embryoniclike state.

In living mice they activated the four genes (known as “Yamanaka factors,” for researcher Shinya Yamanaka, the Nobelist who discovered their combined potential in 2006). This approach rejuvenated damaged muscles and the pancreas in a middle-aged mouse, and extended by 30 percent the life span of a mouse with a genetic mutation responsible for Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome, which causes rapid aging in children.

Because the Yamanaka factors reverse changes made to gene regulators, some scientists see the study as further evidence that aging is driven by epigenetic changes. “I do think that epigenetic reprogramming is the ultimate way to reverse aging,” says David Sinclair, a Harvard University geneticist and anti-aging researcher who was not involved in the study but is doing similar work. “My lab has a lot of evidence that the primary driver of what we call the hallmarks of aging is the epigenetic change.” Sinclair says his lab is preparing a paper explaining what causes these changes as we age.

The Salk study was conducted on middle-aged mice. But in theory, reprogramming epigenetics should work on mice and people at any age, says first author Alejandro Ocampo, adding that even cells from human centenarians could eventually be rejuvenated. He and Belmonte say they think they can improve the efficiency and results of the technique with more research—and that they can undo the epigenetic changes responsible for aging by using easier-to-handle chemicals instead of the Yamanaka factors, hopefully moving toward the possibility of treatment for people.

Matt Kaeberlein, a molecular biologist at the University of Washington who studies aging but was not part of the work, says other researchers have found that the Yamanaka factors can rejuvenate cells—so in some ways this study is not surprising. But Kaeberlein says no one else had yet shown that the factors can treat age-related diseases in an animal by making the same changes. “That’s the wow factor,” he explains.

Kaeberlein says the study suggests it may be possible not just to slow aging but to actually reverse it. “That’s really exciting—that means that even in elderly people it may be possible to restore youthful function,” he says. Plus, it is easier to imagine a treatment that makes changes to the epigenome than to consider going into every cell and changing its genes. He also notes that the results of the new study are very similar to those seen when senescent cells—those that have lost function due to aging—are removed from an organism. It is not yet clear, he says, whether “this is another way to shut down or maybe reprogram senescent cells.”

Manuel Serrano, an expert on senescence at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center in Madrid, was not associated with the new research but says he is impressed with the study and its results. “I fully agree with the conclusions. This work indicates that epigenetic shift is in part responsible for aging, and reprogramming can correct these epigenetics errors,” he wrote in an e-mail. “This will be the basis for future exciting developments.”

The study also showed how fine the line can be between benefit and harm. When the researchers treated mice continually, some developed tumors and died within a week. When the scientists cut the treatment to two days out of seven, however, the mice benefited significantly. Sinclair says this should be taken as a note of caution by anyone trying to increase the human life span. “We’ve all been playing with fire,” he says, adding that this fine line will make it challenging to get a drug approved by regulatory agencies. “This is going to be what we spend the next 10 years figuring out: how to reprogram cells to be young again without taking it too far so they become tumors.”

Both Sinclair and Kaeberlein say they wish Belmonte’s lab had shown that a normal mouse could live longer after the gene tinkering—instead of just reversing an aging-related illness.

Belmonte, like some other anti-aging researchers, says his initial goal is to increase the “health span”—the number of years that someone remains healthy. Extending life span, the number of years someone remains alive, will likely take longer to achieve. Most major killers, including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s, are diseases of aging that become far more common past middle age. “This is not just a matter of how many years we can live but how well we can live the rest of our life,” Ocampo says.

Belmonte says his team is also trying to determine if aging is a process that occurs simultaneously throughout the body. Or, as he puts it, “Is there some tissue that regulates aging—and when that goes bad, the entire organism goes bad?” He says they currently think the brain’s hypothalamus—known as the seat of control for hormones, body temperature, mood, hunger and circadian rhythms—may also act as a regulator of aging.

Other approaches that have been discovered to have anti-aging benefits in animals include calorie restriction, the drug rapamycin and parabiosis—the practice of giving old mice a blood supply from younger ones. The fact that these diverse strategies all seem to work suggests there may be more than one way to age, and that multiple complementary therapies may be needed to significantly extend longevity, Kaeberlein says.

Some compounds such as resveratrol, a substance found in red wine that seems to have anti-aging properties in high concentrations, appear to delay epigenetic change and protect against damage from epigenetic deterioration, Sinclair says. These approaches can reverse some aspects of aging, such as muscle degeneration—but aging returns when the treatment stops, he adds. With an approach like the one Belmonte lays out in the new study, theoretically “you could have one treatment and go back 10 or 20 years,” he says. If aging starts to catch up to you again, you simply get another treatment.

“This work is the first glimmer that we could live for centuries,” Sinclair says, adding that he would happily do so himself: “Forty-seven years went by pretty quickly.”

This may help….


Lowering salt intake could stave off dementia

A high-salt diet may negatively affect cognitive function.

A high-salt diet may negatively affect cognitive function by causing a deficiency of nitric oxide, which is vital for maintaining vascular health in the brain, according to a new study in mice from Weill Cornell Medicine researchers.

When nitric oxide levels are too low, chemical changes to the protein tau occur in the brain, contributing to dementia.

The investigators concluded that lowering salt intake and maintaining healthy blood vessels in the brain may “stave off” dementia. Accumulation of tau deposits has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

“Our study proposes a new mechanism by which salt mediates cognitive impairment and also provides further evidence of a link between dietary habits and cognitive function,” said lead author Giuseppe Faraco, an assistant professor of research in neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine.

The study builds upon research published in 2018 that found that a high-salt diet caused dementia in mice. The rodents became unable to complete daily living tasks such as building their nests and had problems passing memory tests. The research team determined that the high-salt diet was causing cells in the small intestine to release the molecule interleukin-17 (IL-17), which promotes inflammation as part of the body’s immune response.

IL-17 enters the bloodstream and prevents the cells in the walls of blood vessels feeding the brain from producing the compound nitric oxide. This compound works by relaxing and widening the blood vessels, allowing blood to flow. Conversely, a shortage of nitric oxide can restrict blood flow.

In their new study, the investigators found that decreased nitric oxide production in blood vessels also affects the stability of tau proteins in neurons. “Tau becoming unstable and coming off the cytoskeleton causes trouble,” said Costantino Iadecola, senior author of the study. He added that tau is not supposed to be free in the cell. Once tau detaches from the cytoskeleton, the protein can accumulate in the brain, causing cognitive problems. The researchers determined that healthy levels of nitric oxide keep tau in check. “It puts the brakes on activity caused by a series of enzymes that leads to tau disease pathology,” he said.

Overall, the study highlights how vascular health is important to the brain. “As we demonstrated, there’s more than one way that the blood vessels keep the brain healthy,” Iadecola said.

Scars and Your Skin

How Do Scars Form?

Scars form when the dermis (deep, thick layer of skin) is damaged. The body forms new collagen fibers (a naturally occurring protein in the body) to mend the damage, resulting in a scar. The new scar tissue will have a different texture and quality than the surrounding tissue. Scars form after a wound is completely healed.

help to fade scares
Fade scars,This may help.

There are different kinds of scars. Most scars are flat and pale. However, in cases when the body produces too much collagen, scars can be raised. Raised scars are called hypertrophic scars or keloid scars. Both of these kinds of scars are more common in younger and dark-skinned people.

Some scars can have a sunken or pitted appearance. This kind of scarring occurs when underlying structures supporting the skin (for example, fat or muscle) are lost. Some surgical scars have this appearance, as do some scars from acne.

Scars also can appear as stretched skin. Such scars result when the skin stretches rapidly (for example, as in growth spurts or during pregnancy). In addition, this type of scar can occur when the skin is under tension (near a joint, for example) during the healing process.

How Can Scars Be Treated?

Although scars cannot be completely removed, their appearance can be improved to some extent. Methods for improving the appearance of scars include:

  • Topical treatments, such as vitamin E, cocoa butter cream, and several commercial skin care products sold over the counter may be somewhat effective in helping to heal scars.
  • Surgery. Although it will not remove a scar, surgery can be used to alter a scar’s shape or make it less noticeable. Surgery is not recommended in cases of hypertrophic or keloid scarring (raised scars) because there is a risk of recurring scars as well as more severe scarring that results from the treatment.
  • Steroid injections. A course of steroid injections into a scar may help flatten it. Injections may help to soften the appearance of keloid or hypertrophic scars.
  • Radiotherapy. Low-dose, superficial radiotherapy is used to prevent recurrence of severe keloid and hypertrophic scarring. This treatment is used only in extreme cases because of potential long-term side effects.
  • Dermabrasion. This treatment involves the removal of the surface of the skin with special equipment. Dermabrasion is useful to blend in the irregularities of a scar whether it is raised or depressed.
  •  Microdermabrasion is a much less invasive form of dermabrasion but is minimally useful for very superficial scars.
  • Laser resurfacing . This procedure, similar to dermabrasion, removes the surface layers of the skin using different types of lasers. Newer types of lasers may achieve more subtle results by working on the collagen in the dermis without removing the upper layers of skin. This advancement results in little down time as opposed to traditional laser resurfacing and dermabrasion, which requires a longer recovery.
  • Filler injections. These treatments can be used to raise sunken scars to the level of surrounding skin. The effects of these injections are only temporary, however, and the procedures may need to be regularly repeated. Newer forms of injectable fillers are now on the market and may be an option for some people.
  • Microneedling. Many small puncture holes are made into the superficial skin to stimulate collagen production and even introduce collagen stimulators or other products to try to reduce the appearance of scars.

Look and Feel Younger 1, 2, 3

Berberine , Quercetin, Resveratrol 

Berberine Information

Berberine is a chemical found in several plants including European barberry, goldenseal, goldthread, Oregon grape, phellodendron, and tree turmeric.

Berberine is most commonly taken by mouth for diabetes, high levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia), and high blood pressure. It is also applied to the skin to treat burns and canker sores, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Berberine might cause stronger heartbeats. This might help people with certain heart conditions. Berberine might also help regulate how the body uses sugar in the blood. This might help people with diabetes. It also might also be able to kill bacteria and reduce swelling.

Quercetin Information

Quercetin is a plant pigment (flavonoid). It is found in many plants and foods, such as red wine, onions, green tea, apples, berries, Ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort, American elder, and others. Buckwheat tea has a large amount of quercetin. People use quercetin as a medicine.

Quercetin is most commonly taken by mouth to treat conditions of the heart and blood vessels and prevent cancer. It is also used for arthritis, bladder infections, and diabetes. But there is limited scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Quercetin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects which might help reduce inflammation, kill cancer cells, control blood sugar, and help prevent heart disease.

Resveratrol Information

Resveratrol is part of a group of compounds called polyphenols. They’re thought to act like antioxidants, protecting the body against damage that can put you at higher risk for things like cancer and heart disease.

It’s in the skin of red grapes, but you can also find it in peanuts and berries.

Manufacturers have tried to capitalize on its powers by selling resveratrol supplements. Most resveratrol capsules sold in the U.S. contain extracts from an Asian plant called Polygonum cuspidatum. Other resveratrol supplements are made from red wine or red grape extracts.

Ads touting these supplements on the Internet promise everything from weight loss to a healthier, longer life.

Do resveratrol supplements really deliver on those promises?

Benefits

It’s gained a lot of attention for its reported anti-aging and disease-fighting powers. Still, it’s important to note that while experts agree that it does have potential, there’s still not enough data to confirm its effectiveness. Still, early research does suggest it might help protect you against:

Heart disease: It’s thought to help reduce inflammation, lower LDL or “bad” cholesterol, and make it more difficult for clots to form that can lead to a heart attack.

Cancer: It could limit the spread of cancer cells and start killing them.

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